Take Your Own Advice (You're Doing Great, Sweetie)

I stumbled across an email the other day — one that I had sent three years ago. In it, I gave some lifestyle guidance to a friend interested in living balanced and healthy. I wrote about choosing real foods, and not beating yourself up or restricting different groups. I wrote about working out to feel good, as opposed to working out to look good. 

I wrote about all of these things — things I still struggle with today.

I wrote about them in the voice of someone that knew — someone that knew how to handle the things that tied me down. Three years ago, I wrote about them as someone who knew.

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I grabbed dinner with a friend the other day. We chatted about some of the mental blocks we sometimes face. We talked about self-sabotaging, feeling deserving of good things in life (or lack thereof that feeling) — how to catch unhealthy thoughts before they take control. We talked about how to win the war through different battles — how to let it go if we lose some along the way.

I talked about all of these things — things I still struggle with today.

I talked about them in the voice of someone that knew — someone that knew how to handle the things that tied me down. The other day, I talked about them as someone who knew.

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I thought about what it meant. I thought about what it meant that I can “talk the talk,” but yet, I often struggle to “walk the walk.”

I thought about how I believe so strongly that my friends, family, acquaintances — people I have yet to meet — deserve all of these things. They deserve balance, freedom, confidence — love. I thought about how I knew how to help them believe it, too.

I thought about how I didn’t believe it for myself. 

I thought about everything I didn’t allow myself to believe to be true.

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I don’t know why we do it.

I don’t know why we see things for other people that we can’t see for ourselves.

I don’t know why we drag ourselves down each time we, finally, almost reach the top.  

I’ve looked at my past experiences, different ways I’ve grown up, my innate need to compare myself to others, specifically in the age of social media (what’s up, addiction) — I’ve looked at these things and I’ve realized that these are some of the answers — my answers. 

Digging into the “why” behind limiting behaviors and thoughts is insanely important.

What I’m realizing now, is that what might be more important, is what comes next.

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I’ve done the reading, I’ve listened to the podcasts, I’ve given the advice — I’ve done the work. 

None of it matters, until I believe it’s possible for myself.

I need to believe that I can beat my demons. I need to believe that I can come out on top.

I need to believe that I deserve to.

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Reading the email I had sent years ago showed me that you’ll deal with the same things today, tomorrow, next year — three years from now — if you don’t learn to start applying things to yourself.

And believe me, I get it — it sucks. It sucks knowing that you’ve had the knowledge you need all along — that you’ve been the only thing holding yourself back.

It sucks knowing that you didn’t realize it sooner.  

But I needed to see it for myself. I needed to open that email and see that everything I had ever needed had been with me all along.

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I’ve learned about my past experiences, my demons — my limiters. I’ve learned that now, I just need to live.

 I’ve learned that it’s time to put the reading into action — to apply the things I know to my own life. To stop pretending I don’t know what I’ve known all along.

 I’ve learned that for once, it’s maybe, just maybe

time to take my own advice.

Anastasia Warren